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Smart city business plan

What is a smart city? The answer depends on who you ask. Everyone is right. A smart city, built properly, will provide different value to different stakeholders. They know it only as a place they want to live in, work in, and be a part of. To build this type of city, you have to first build the smart city ecosystem. A scan of the various smart city definitions found that technology is a common element.

But what does a smart city really do? As a starting point, we define a smart city is one that uses technology extensively to achieve key outcomes for its various stakeholders, including residents, businesses, municipal organizations and visitors. Figure Two shows our framework for a smart city ecosystem. A vibrant and sustainable city is an ecosystem comprised of people, organizations and businesses, policies, laws and processes integrated together to create the desired outcomes shown in Figure One.

This city is adaptive, responsive and always relevant to all those who live, work in and visit the city. A smart city integrates technology to accelerate, facilitate, and transform this ecosystem. There are four types of value creators in the smart city ecosystem. They create and consume value around one of the outcomes listed in Figure One.

3 reasons why Singapore is the smartest city in the world

When people think of a smart city, they automatically think of services provided by municipal and quasi-government agencies, such as smart parking, smart water management, smart lighting, and so on. In fact, there are three other value providers and users that co-exist in the smart city — businesses and organizations, communities, and residents.

Businesses and organizations may create services that use and create information to create outcomes for its stakeholders. Communities are miniature smart cities, but with very localized needs.

smart city business plan

They have needs for smart services that may be tailored specifically for their stakeholders. Residents or individual citizens are also smart services providers in the smart city. A resident living near a dangerous street intersection can point a camera at the intersection and stream that information live to traffic planners and police.As technological, demographic, and economic shifts redefine urban centers, local government and business leaders need an updated vision and business plan for the future, with the performance gains to be achieved.

To provide them with the required decision support and ROI analytics, ThoughtLab is launching a ground-breaking research program in conjunction with a coalition of organizations that have a stake in the cities of the future. Unlike other research on this topic, our economists will produce compelling, evidence-based research that provides a clear business case for investment—not just in digital technology, but in essential infrastructure, optimal land use patterns, human capital, and civic institutions.

Your email address will not be published. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. In what ways will smarter cities of the future create value for consumers, businesses, and the local government in the future?

Which innovative financing solutions will work best in the future?What is a smart city? The answer depends on who you ask. Everyone is right. A smart city, built properly, will have different value for different stakeholders.

smart city business plan

They know it only as a place they want to live in, work in, and be a part of. A scan of the various smart city definitions found that technology is a common element. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers IEEE envisions a smart city as one that brings together technology, government and society to enable the following characteristics: a smart economy, smart mobility, a smart environment, smart people, smart living, smart governance.

But what does a smart city really do? As a starting point, we define a smart city is one that uses technology extensively to achieve key outcomes for its various stakeholders, including residents, businesses, municipal organizations and visitors. Figure Two shows our framework for a smart city ecosystem.

A vibrant and sustainable city is an ecosystem comprised of people, organizations and businesses, policies, laws and processes integrated together to create the desired outcomes shown in Figure One.

This city is adaptive, responsive and always relevant to all those who live, work in and visit the city. A smart city integrates technology to accelerate, facilitate, and transform this ecosystem. Figure Two. The smart city ecosystem framework. There are four types of value creators in the smart city ecosystem. They create and consume value around one of the outcomes listed in Figure One. While technology is a critical enabler, it is just one of many foundational capabilities that every smart city must have.

No one capability is more important than the rest.

smart city business plan

Each capabilities plays a different role in the smart city. These capabilities must integrate and coordinate with each other to carry out its mission. Value layer. This is the most visible layer for city residents, businesses, visitors, workers, students, tourists and others.

Innovation layer. To stay relevant, value creators in the smart city must continuously innovate and update its services for its stakeholders. Smart cities proactively facilitate this through a variety of innovation programs, including labs, innovation zones, training, ideation workshops, skills development and partnerships with universities and businesses. Governance, management and operations layer.

A Strategic Plan for Smart Cities: Going Beyond Technology

The smart city creates disruption and results in digital transformation of existing processes and services. Smart city management models must integrate a new ecosystem of value creators and innovators. They must plan, support and monetize new business models, processes and services. Finally, they must measure the performance of the city with a new set of metrics. Policy, processes, and public-private partnerships, and financing layer.

An entirely new set of engagement models, rules, financing sources, and partners are required to build, operate and maintain the smart city. Information and data layer. The lifeblood of the smart city is information. The smart city must facilitate this in several ways, including open data initiatives, data marketplaces, analytics services, and monetization policies. Equally important, they must have programs that encourage data sharing and privacy policies to protect what and how data is gathered.

Connectivity, accessibility and security layer. People, things and systems are interconnected in the smart city.Funding and financing strategies for smart cities has been saved. Funding and financing strategies for smart cities has been removed.

An Article Titled Funding and financing strategies for smart cities already exists in Saved items. Smart cities require infrastructure modernization—a high price-tag proposition that can be daunting for any city. See how innovative financing strategies are helping cities around the world transform vision into reality. The Deloitte Global series on funding and financing smart cities offers research and guiding principles for creative alternatives to traditional infrastructure financing models, based on the experiences of government officials, industry leaders, and our own professionals who have actively facilitated smart cities funding for clients.

Smart cities are a new concept with new technologies. Attracting investors requires a comprehensive strategic plan that clearly communicates the opportunity and presents a robust business model, a creative approach to funding and financing—new sources of revenue, new business models for recovery and value capture—and innovative financing structures for investors.

We recommend that you explore our series starting with " The challenge of paying for smart cities " followed by articles of particular interest to you. This series offers research-based guidance on funding and procurement options with valuable insights from smart cities projects worldwide. An infrastructure investment can generate value directly and indirectly. When planned from the outset of a project, Government can define mechanisms to capture a portion of this value to help fund and finance the specific project or future expenditures.

For private sector and institutional investors, developing economies present significant challenges, including political, regulatory, macroeconomic, business, and technical risks. International development organizations IDOs —multilateral development banks, development finance institutions, bilateral donors—can offer developing economies critical support and risk mitigation through low-interest loans, equity investments, credit guarantees, and technical assistance.

Many cities are exploring ways to upgrade infrastructure with smart technologies, but paying for these projects presents a significant challenge: Introducing smart technologies on a wide-scale basis.

ГРАДОСТРОЙ НА МИНИМАЛКАХ - SMART CITY PLAN ПЕРВЫЙ ВЗГЛЯД

Read more about ways increase the odds of success on large-scale smart cities projects by exploring the full range of options for funding, financing, and procurement. The alliance approach the alliance approach is a creative financing model based on forming partnerships, procuring products and services, and providing governance to realize the promise of smart cities.

The model enables governments to develop new partnership ecosystems and conduct flexible procurements, allowing municipalities to quickly test and deploy smart cities solutions first and then scale up solutions that provide real benefits.

This article examines creative ways municipalities are using private and non-profit participation to advance their smart cities agendas. We also distill lessons learned to help other cash-strapped cities overcome funding and financing barriers and move forward on smart cities projects.

Cities ready for major infrastructure reinvestment and modernization can embrace smart cities to become more secure, safe, resilient, and globally competitive. By championing smart cities, government finance officers can play a key role in urban reinvestment and modernization, using fiscal policy, public-private partnership, and performance-based revenue models to enable the transformation to smart cities.

Explore ideas from trusted leaders with extensive experience and diverse perspectives on leadership, strategy, business operations, innovation, and emerging capabilities. Fullwidth SCC. Do not delete! This message will not be visible when page is activated. Funding and financing strategies for smart cities. Michael is a corporate finance partner and leads our debt advisory practice focusing on real estate and infrastructure financing.

A global network, local insight and extensive sector knowledge and deal experience. Deloitte advises government clients on new techniques to analyze, prioritize, finance, and provide government infrastructure projects with enhanced visibility into cost, schedule, and quality.

Please enable JavaScript to view the site. Viewing offline content Limited functionality available. My Deloitte. Undo My Deloitte. Save for later. Explore our series on funding and financing smart cities The Deloitte Global series on funding and financing smart cities offers research and guiding principles for creative alternatives to traditional infrastructure financing models, based on the experiences of government officials, industry leaders, and our own professionals who have actively facilitated smart cities funding for clients.

Smart Cities funding and financing. Expand Full screen. Smart Cities funding and financing Reset. Smart cities funding and financing in developing economies For private sector and institutional investors, developing economies present significant challenges, including political, regulatory, macroeconomic, business, and technical risks.Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website.

See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details. Published on Apr 1, Cisco smart city aims to pioneer Internet of Everything IoE into every home, street and community aimed at ensuring safety for citizens and increasing energy efficiency.

This presentation on the alignment of IT, Business and Corporate strategies gives a detailed idea on how a company as big as cisco can implement their plan into action. SlideShare Explore Search You. Submit Search.

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No Downloads. Views Total views. Actions Shares. No notes for slide. Executive Summary 4 5. Introduction 5 6.We use cookies essential for this site to function well. Please click "Accept" to help us improve its usefulness with additional cookies. Learn about our use of cookies, and collaboration with select social media and trusted analytics partners here Learn more about cookies, Opens in new tab. Until recently, city leaders thought of smart technologies primarily as tools for becoming more efficient behind the scenes.

Now technology is being injected more directly into the lives of residents. Smartphones have become the keys to the city, putting instant information about transit, traffic, health services, safety alerts, and community news into millions of hands.

After a decade of trial and error, municipal leaders are realizing that smart-city strategies start with people, not technology. It is also about using technology and data purposefully to make better decisions and deliver a better quality of life.

Quality of life has many dimensions, from the air residents breathe to how safe they feel walking the streets. It finds that cities can use smart technologies to improve some key quality-of-life indicators by 10 to 30 percent—numbers that translate into lives saved, fewer crime incidents, shorter commutes, a reduced health burden, and carbon emissions averted.

Smart cities put data and digital technology to work to make better decisions and improve the quality of life. More comprehensive, real-time data gives agencies the ability to watch events as they unfold, understand how demand patterns are changing, and respond with faster and lower-cost solutions.

Three layers work together to make a smart city hum Exhibit 1. First is the technology base, which includes a critical mass of smartphones and sensors connected by high-speed communication networks. The second layer consists of specific applications. Translating raw data into alerts, insight, and action requires the right tools, and this is where technology providers and app developers come in.

The third layer is usage by cities, companies, and the public. Many applications succeed only if they are widely adopted and manage to change behavior. They encourage people to use transit during off-hours, to change routes, to use less energy and water and to do so at different times of day, and to reduce strains on the healthcare system through preventive self-care.

MGI assessed how smart-city applications could affect various quality-of-life dimensions: safety, time and convenience, health, environmental quality, social connectedness and civic participation, jobs, and the cost of living see interactive.

The wide range of outcomes reflects the fact that applications perform differently from city to city, depending on factors such as legacy infrastructure systems and on baseline starting points.

Deploying a range of applications to their maximum effect could potentially reduce fatalities from homicide, road traffic, and fires by 8 to 10 percent. In a high-crime city with a population of five million, this could mean saving up to lives each year. Incidents of assault, robbery, burglary, and auto theft could be lowered by 30 to 40 percent. On top of these metrics are the incalculable benefits of giving residents freedom of movement and peace of mind.

Technology is not a quick fix for crime, but agencies can use data to deploy scarce resources and personnel more effectively. Real-time crime mapping, for instance, utilizes statistical analysis to highlight patterns, while predictive policing goes a step further, anticipating crime to head off incidents before they occur. When incidents do occur, applications such as gunshot detection, smart surveillance, and home security systems can accelerate law-enforcement response.

But data-driven policing has to be deployed in a way that protects civil liberties and avoids criminalizing specific neighborhoods or demographic groups.

Seconds count when lives are at stake, making speed critical for first responders in getting to the scene of emergencies. Smart systems can optimize call centers and field operations, while traffic-signal preemption gives emergency vehicles a clear driving path. These types of applications could cut emergency response times by 20 to 35 percent.

A city with an already low response time of eight minutes could shave off almost two minutes. A city starting with an average response time of 50 minutes might be able to trim that by more than 17 minutes. Tens of millions of people in cities worldwide begin and end every workday fuming in traffic or piling into overcrowded buses and trains.

Improving the daily commute is critical to quality of life. Bycities that deploy smart-mobility applications have the potential to cut commuting times by 15 to 20 percent on average, with some people enjoying even larger reductions. In a dense city with extensive transit, smart technologies could save the average commuter almost 15 minutes a day.Opening onto luxuriant gardens, the apartments present a privileged living environment. Mango Village offers families a contemporary architectural-styled home where open indoor spaces connect seamlessly with the outdoors, demonstrating an all-encompassing, sustainable vision for family living.

Smart cities: Digital solutions for a more livable future

Designed around a water feature with a perfect blend of industrial heritage and contemporary architecture, the Business Park is the perfect address to grow your company. With its contemporary architecture on a human scale, the Office Park will offer a range of offices and workspaces located by the lake and in close proximity to the business hotel and Lifestyle Village. Les Muguets, the latest residential project of Beau Plan is developing its first phase at the heart of the smart city project.

Steps away from the lake and orchards, from your office and from every amenity is a lively and colourful place of life. Create the daily life that suits you in Beau Plan!

Imagine a workspace all your own, in a dynamic city where innovation thrives and proximity makes professional exchanges easy. Whether you explore it on foot or by bike, allow your senses to awaken! Give yourself every chance of success. Beau Plan is a place of inspiration and of exchange, where creativity flourishes in every form.

Give your talent fresh momentum! Set in the heart of an exceptional heritage area dotted with centuries-old trees, orchards and industrial vestiges, Beau Plan offers a modern and creative living environment in the north of Mauritius; a city in which residential and commercial spaces, offices, educational institutions and leisure areas all coexist. Beau Plan celebrates art and culture in every form. From its Creative Park to the African Leadership College ALCand from shops featuring locally-made goods to residential neighbourhoods in which lives are built and memories are made… Beau Plan invites its inhabitants to set their creativity free!

She has danced on the equator in Indonesia and with a chair in Paris. She has shared her passion with Mauritians via her company, Omada, since A popular destination among expatriates and investors, Mauritius offers an attractive legal and fiscal framework to foreigners who wish to invest in real estate. Interested in relocating? Under the verandas of its Creole houses, beneath its factory chimneys and ancient trees, and within the historic workshops whose walls have borne witness to countless human adventures, the Pamplemousses region plunges you deep into a past full of Mauritian stories.

At its heart is Beau Plan. This authentic city offers all the comforts of modern living within a carefully planned development, and is based on a vision of a sustainable way of life that can be passed on to future generations.


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